Oct 2. Hamlet 3.1-3.2 & Secondary Sources

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Student Teaching Groups


Group/Number Students
G10 Danny, Maya, Kyle, Rishi
G13 Brandon, Ravi, Andres, David

Preliminary Paper Claims

Get into groups and discuss you response to the paper prompt and then be prepared to share your findings with the class:

  • What is the relationship between Hamlet (or Hamlet) and one of the following key terms: hoarding, collectibles, vibrant matter, preservation, waste, recycling, or accumulation?

Secondary Sources & MLA Searches

‘How-To’: Write an Annotation

For the Literary Analysis Paper, you need to incorporate one scholarly source. I suggest you compose your “literature review” paragraph as an annotation.

An annotation is a short statement in which you summarize and assess the validity of a  source, describe its methodology, and explain why the source is relevant to your research.

  • 1. Cite the source in MLA
  • 2. Write 2-3 sentences that give a broad overview of the argument, aims, and/or scope of the source: what are the main claims/goals, what are the key terms, what’s the context; whose the audience, etc.?
  • 3. Write 2-3 sentences explain the main mode of inquiry and/or evidence the source uses to achieve her main claim/goal. Literary scholars main mode of inquiry is close reading, but what methods do performers or authors of databases use to achieve their goals? 
  • 4. Write 1-2 sentences that assess the validity of the source. Did the author accomplish the goal he set out for himself? You’ve already stated the main claim/goal and the evidence/methods the author uses to achieve that goal, so now assess the source’s success. 
  • 5. Write 1-2 sentences that explain how the source fits into your larger web project.

RQ: Hamlet, 4.5-4.7

Featured Image: John Evert Millias (1852)

Directions

Keep the following questions in mind as you read Hamlet, Act 4, Scenes 5-7. The questions are designed to guide your reading practices and our class discussions. You are not required to provide formal answers in class or online.

4.5

Why does Ophelia want to speak with Gertrude and why does Gertrude initially refuse?

According to the Gentleman (4.5.4-16), How has Ophelia changed since we last saw her and what has caused the change?

According to Messenger report (4.5.98-110), how have the “The rabble” (4.5.102) responded to Polonius’s death and Laertes’s return from France?

How do Gertrude and Claudius respond to Laertes and he political threat he poses?

How does Laertes respond to Ophelia when he meets her for the first time after returning to Denmark?

Ophelia’s Mad Scene, 4.5.169-192

 

Ophelia
There’s rosemary; that’s for remembrance. Pray you, love, remember. And there is pansies; that’s for thoughts.
Laertes
document in madness, thoughts and remembrance fitted.
Ophelia
There’s fennel for you, and columbines. There’s rue for you, and here’s some for me; we may call it herb of grace o’Sundays. You may wear your rue with a difference. There’s a daisy. I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died. They say ‘a made a good end.
[She sings.]
For bonny sweet Robin is all my joy.
Laertes
Thought and afflictionspassion, hell itself
She turns to favor and to prettiness.
Ophelia
Song.
And will ‘a not come again?
And will ‘a not come again?
No, no, he is dead,
Go to thy deathbed,
He never will come again.
His beard was as white as snow,
Flaxen was his poll.
He is gone, he is gone,
And we cast away moan.
God ‘a’ mercy on his soul!
And of all Christians’ souls, I pray God. God b’wi’you!
[Exit Ophelia, followed by the Queen.]

4.6

What does Hamlet’s letter ask Horatio to do for the Sailors?
According to the letter he sent Horatio, what happened to Hamlet on his way to England?
What has happened to Rozencrantz and Guildentstern?

4.7

According to his confession to Laertes (4.7.10-25), why hasn’t Claudius killed Hamlet?
What reasons does Laertes think he has to revenge himself against Hamlet?
What does Hamlet say in his letter to Claudius (4.7.43-6), and how does Claudius respond? What’s your assessment of Claudius’s interpretation of the letter?
Describe Claudius’s plan to kill Hamlet (4.7.125-137).
According to Gertrude’s report, how did Ophelia die (4.7.164-180)?
How does Laertes react?

Report of Ophelia’s Drowning, 4.7.161-180

Queen
One woe doth tread upon another’s heel,
So fast they follow. Your sister’s drowned, Laertes.
Laertes
Drowned! Oh, where?
Queen
There is a willow grows askant the brook
That shows his hoary leaves in the glassy stream.
Therewith fantastic garlands did she make
Of crowflowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples,
That liberal shepherds give a grosser name,
But our cull-cold maids do dead men’s fingers call them.
There on the pendent boughs her crownet weeds
Clamb’ring to hang, an envious sliver broke,
When down her weedy trophies and herself
Fell in the weeping brook. Her clothes spread wide,
And mermaid-like awhile they bore her up,
Which time she chanted snatches of old lauds,
As one incapable of her own distress,
Or like a creature native and endued
Unto that element. But long it could not be
Till that her garments, heavy with their drink,
Pulled the poor wretch from her melodious lay
To muddy death.

 

 

RQ: Hamlet, Act 4.1-4.4.4

Featured Image: Andrea Mantegna, The di sotto in sù ceiling panel of the Camera picta.

Directions

Keep the following questions in mind as you read Hamlet, Act 4, Scenes 1-4. The questions are designed to guide your reading practices and our class discussions. You are not required to provide formal answers in class or online.

4.1

What does Claudius want Gertrude to “translate” for him (4.1.2)?

Does Gertrude fulfill her promise to Hamlet?

Who’s responsible for Polonius’s murder? How does Claudius respond to Polonius’s murder?

What does Claudius mean when he says that he must “Both countenance and excuse” (4.1.32) Polonius’s murder?

How/why does Claudius begin to figure Hamlet, his actions and his “madness,” as a disease, which has infected the state (4.1.19-22; 4.310-11; and 4.3.64-5)

4.2

Why does Hamlet call Rozencrantz a “sponge” (4.2.11 & 19)?

What does Hamlet mean when he says, “The King is a thing” (4.2.26)?

In Q1, these lines come earlier in the play at 3.2.342-63 during Hamlet and R& G’s exchange about recorders (3.2.342-63). Do you think that placement is better or worse?

4.3

What stops Claudius from putting “the strong law,” (4.3.3) on Hamlet? In other words, what holds Claudius back from punishing Hamlet to the greatest extent of the of which he is the final judge/jury?

How does Hamlet respond when asked where he has deposited Polonius’s body?

What do you make of Hamlet’s ecology: “Your worm is your only emperor for diet. We fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots. Your fat king and your lean beggar is but variable service, two dishes but to one table. That’s the end” (4.3.21-24)?

According to Hamlet, how does “nature” threaten political systems from the inside?

What’s going to happen to Hamlet after R & G deliver Claudius’s letter? Why does Claudius trust the King of England will do as he commands?

4.4

Where are Fortinbras and his army, who Hamlet sees cross through Denmark, going to attack?

What do you make of the Captain’s explanation of the war they are all about to fight:

Truly to speak, and with no addition,

We go to gain a little patch of ground

That hath in it no profit but the name.

To pay five ducats—five—I would not farm it,

Nor will it yield to Norway or the Pole

A ranker state should it be sold in fee. (4.4.16-21)

How does Hamlet respond to the sight of Fortinbras marching across Denmark to attack Poland?

Is his response in proportion to the event?

How does Hamlet interpret the political event he witnesses personally? Does his response mark a change in his revenge plans?

The speech beginning, “How all occasions do inform against me” (4.4.31-65) is not included in Shakespeare’s First Folio (1623), or any Folio editions. How does the inclusion (in Q2)/exclusion of the speech change the way we read and/or interpret Hamlet?

Hamlet, Kenneth Branagh (1996)

“How all occasions” in Q2

“How all occasions” omission in F1

Arden Edition (2016)

 

27 Sept. Hamlet Act 2 & Student Teaching Activity Prep

Featured Image: Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man, 1490

Hamlet, Act 2: Overview & Pathological Collectables/Collectors

Remember that in the conclusion to his chapter,”Pathological Collectables,” Scott Herring tells us that he hopes to make “good on museum studies scholar Susan M. Pearce’s claim that ‘unacceptable collectors, among other things, are making important assertions about the ‘ordinary’ material world and out relationship to it, [a relationship] which we ignore to our detriment'” (84). By this Herring means that while people who have trouble letting do suffer pathological attachment to things, and should certainly be diagnosed and treated, they are also responding to and embodying ways larger social forces fail around grief, loss, and anxiety.

Freewrite

Take 5-7 minutes and respond to the following:
The characters spend the bulk of act two trying to diagnose Hamlet. Make a list of the diagnoses that are proposed. Are the proposed causes of Hamlet’s madness psychological or social?

Reaction Activity

  1. Get into your Student Teaching Groups, read through your assigned questions and the text the question asks about.
  2. Next, respond to your assigned question in 2-3 sentences at the number that corresponds to your group number on the board.
  3. Finally, once you have finished writing down your response, move to another group’s response and then read through it, and in 1-2 sentences explain why you agree or disagree with the other group’s responses on the board.

Group/Number Questions
G1, G7, G13 Polonius responds to Hamlet’s seeming craziness with “That he is mad, ’tis true. ‘Tis true ’tis pity,/And pity ’tis ’tis true–a foolish figure” (2.2.1125-1126). What’s Polonius even saying here? Do you agree with Polonius’s assessment, why/why not?
G2, G8, G14 What plan(s) do Polonius, Claudius, and Gertrude hatch to discovery the cause of Hamlet’s madness (2.2.1197-1201)? Do you think their will be plan(s) successful, why/why not?
G3, G9, G15 What does Hamlet mean when he says, “I am mad but north-north-west. When the wind is southerly I know a hawk from a handsaw” (2.2.1426-11427)?
G4, G10, G16 What is the topic of the speech that Hamlet begins, and the First Player completes (2.2.1510-1559). Why does Hamlet like the speech so much?
G5, G11, G17 What’s Hamlet’s assessment of the Player’s speech (2.2.1589-1611)? Do you think that his analysis of the speech is accurate, why/why not?
G6, G12, G18 What does Hamlet plan to do to “catch the conscience of the King” (2.2.1645)? Do you think does Hamlet’s attempt to discover Claudius’s secrets will be more or less successful than the ways the other characters have tried to discover his?

Back to the Paper Claims…

Take a few minutes and respond to the following. Please bring this response with you to class next Tuesday:

  • What is the relationship between Hamlet (or Hamlet) and one of the following key terms: hoarding, collectables, vibrant matter, preservation, waste, recycling, or accumulation?

RQ: Hamlet, Act 3

Featured Image

Directions

Keep the following questions in mind as you read Hamlet, Act 3, Scenes 1-2. The questions are designed to guide your reading practices and our class discussions. You are not required to provide formal answers in class or online.

3.1

Why haven’t Rosencrantz an Guildenstern been able to figure out the cause of Hamlet’s “turbulent and dangerous lunacy” (3.1.4) by the start of Act 3?

Why do you think Claudius asks Gertrude to leave he and Polonius alone to observe Hamlet’s interaction with Ophelia (“seeing unseen” (3.1.32))?

Why does Polonius say to trigger Claudius’s admission of guilt (3.1.50-53)?

Does Hamlet know that Claudius and Polonius can hear him? What do you think of Hamlet delivering this speech to Ophelia?

“To be or not to be” (3.1.55-88)

What, exactly, is the question? “To be, or not to be—that is the question” (3.1.55): “(a) whether life in general is worth living, (b) whether he should take his own life, (c) whether he should act against the king” (314 nn55).

Are there other questions besides, life or not life? Anything else worth asking? Is there anything else, “between all the two’s one likes” (xvii)?

What’s “slings” (3.1.56)?

How does Hamlet define “death”? How does Hamlet define sleep?

What are some of the bad things that a person would escape if the church had not outlawed suicide?

Why words like “bodkin” (3.1.75) and “fardels” (3.1.75)? Compare with words derived from Latin such as “quietus” (3.1.74)?

  • Bodkin of unknown Welsh or Irish derivation
  • Fardel old French and Old English

Ultimately, what stops people from killing themselves, “And makes us rather bear those ills we have/Than fly to others that we know not of” (3.1.80-1)?

Beyond Killing ourselves, what does “conscience” (3.1.82) also stop us from doing and/or turn us into?

How does Hamlet react when he first sees Ophelia? How does his reaction compare with the introspective speech that precedes her entrance?

Original Pronunciation, Hamlet 3.1.55-88

RSC 2009, David Tennant, 2.1.1-38

Adrian Lester as Hamlet: ‘To be or not to be’ | Shakespeare Solos

 

How does Hamlet respond to Ophelia when she attempts to return the letters he gave her, “My lord, I have remembrances of yours/That I have longed to redeliver/I pray you now take them” (3.1.92-4)?

What does “Get thee to a nunnery!” (3.1.120) mean? Why does Hamlet want Ophelia to go there?

Is Hamlet’s response to Ophelia part of his act, his “antic disposition” or is he sincere? Does Hamlet know that Claudius and Polonius are watch their interaction? How does it change the scene if a director decides to stage 3.1 so that Hamlet knows he is being watched?

How does Claudius react to what he sees transpire between Ophelia and Hamlet?

3.2

What direction does Hamlet give the players?

Describe the “dumb show” (3.21128-30).

Describe The Mousetrap (3.2.146-223).

How well does The Mousetrap represent the events that occurred prior to the start of Hamlet?

How does Claudius react to the play? How does Gertrude react to the play?

Here’s a link to the David Tennant, Royal Shakespeare, 2008 Hamlet

The Mousetrap sequence is 74-80

 

George Villiers Duke of Buckingham, Miniature Portrait

3.3

What does Claudius plan to do with Hamlet after he watches the play?

How does Guildenstern “figure” the state (3.3.6-7)? How does Rosencrantz (3.3.11-26)? Do the two representations agree or disagree?

Why do you think that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern agree to take Hamlet to England?

Why does Polonius plan to hide behind the “arras” (3.3.28) in Gertrude’s closet?

Why is Caludius incapable of asking for forgiveness (3.3.53-6)? What’s the difference between heaven and earth in Claudius’s estimation (3.3.60-4)?

What stops Hamlet from killing Claudius at the end of 3.3?

3.4

How does Hamlet plan to approach Gertrude (3.2375-89), and does he follow through on his plan?

What do the repetitions at the start of the chamber sequence establish about Hamlet and Gertrude’s relationship (3.4.4-13)? How does this exchange echo their initial exchange at 1.2.72-5?

Do you think that Hamlet will really kill his own mother at 3.4.20?

How does Hamlet kill Polonius (3.2.21)?

Do you think that Gertrude knows that Claudius killed Old Hamlet? Why/why not?

What visual representations does Hamlet use to compare his father and uncle and chasten his mother for her marriage (3.4.51-70)?

Why do you think Hamlet is so obsessed with his mother and uncle’s sex life (3.4.90-2)?

Do you agree with Gertrude’s diagnosis of her son at (3.4.102)?

Why does the ghost of Old Hamlet appear in this scene?

What does the Ghost ask Hamlet to do?

Do not forget! This isitation

Is but to whet thy almost blunted purpose.

But look, amazement on thy mother sits!

O step between her and her fighting soul.

Conceit in weakest bodies strongest works.

Speak to her Hamlet. (3.4.106-110)

Why can’t Gertrude see the ghost of Old Hamlet (3.4.113-14)?

What does Hamlet command his mother do (3.4.163-69 and 3.4.179-81)?

What does Hamlet plan to do with Polonius’s body?

What complications does the mother pose to father-son relationships?

What does it mean that Hamlet’s identity is defined as between two fathers? How does Hamlet have to choose between two fathers and how does Gertrude complicate this choice?

How does Gertrude obliterate or challenge the memory of the heroic father?

Does Hamlet become more like Claudius, as he forgets and/or becomes less like the father figure he idealizes?

Why should the first mother powerfully present in Shakespeare since the period of his earliest works be portrayed as adulterous?

What is Gertrude’s chief crime?

How does the Gertrude of Hamlet’s imagination differ from the character in her own words?

Does Gertrude “enact every son’s scenario of the good mother, i.e. choosing his interests over her husband’s” (15)?

3.4 Olivier, 1948

3.4 Zeffirelli, 1990

RQ: Hamlet, Act 2

Directions

Keep the following questions in mind as you read Hamlet, Act 2 The questions are designed to guide your reading practices and our class discussions. You are not required to provide formal answers in class or online.

Why do Claudius and Gertrude think that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern will be able to discover the cause of Hamlet’s madness when no one else has been able to figure Hamlet out so far? Is the King and Queen’s faith in the pair misguided, why/why not?

What sort of deal does Voletemand (2.2.60-79) bring back from Norway for Claudius? Is the deal a good one? How does Claudius respond?

Polonius thinks that Hamlet is “mad, ‘tis true, ‘tis true ‘tis pity/And pity ‘tis ‘tis true: a foolish figure!” (2.2.996-7). What does he think has caused Hamlet’s madness? Do you agree?

What’s your assessment of Hamlet’s letters to Ophelia (2.2.107-124)?

Can you think of an example of a time when Polonius “said ‘tis so/When it proved otherwise” (2.2.151-2)?

What plan do Polonius, Claudius, and Gertrude hatch to discovery the cause of Hamlet’s madness? Is their plan successful, why/why not? (Visor Effect)

At such time I’ll loose my daughter to him.

Be you and I behind an arras then,

Mark the encounter: if he love her not

And be not from his reason fallen theron

Let me be no assistant for a state

But keep a farm and carters. (2.2.159-63)

What does Hamlet read (2.2170-201)?

Is Hamlet telling the truth to Rozencrantz and Guildenstern when he describes his “symptoms” at 2.2.261-276? Why/Why not?

Why are the Players, the company of actors, who Hamlet knew while he was a school, traveling throughout the country? (2.2.295-6)

How does Hamlet react to the arrival of the Players?

What does Hamlet mean when he says, “I am mad but north-north-west. When the wind is southerly I know a hawk from a handsaw” (2.2.315-6)?

Summarize the speech that Hamlet begins, and the First Player completes 2.2.388-456. Why does Polonius interrupt the speech and is his interruption justified? Does the speech (re)tell the story of Hamlet and his family?

Is it weird that Hamlet wants to tell the story of the recent past and present with very old stories?

How does Hamlet “read this speech”? What’s Hamlet’s assessment of the Player’s speech and how does he “read” the Player’s speech as indictment of his own failure to respond to his father’s murder correctly? Is Hamlet a coward? What’s your assessment of his progress so far? Do you agree with him, why/why not?

What does Hamlet plan to do to “catch the conscience of the King” (2.2.540)?

First Player’s Speech 2.2.405-456

25 September. Claims, Close Reading, Hamlet 2.1

Hamlet, 1.2-1.5

Let’s chat briefly about your responses to the questions from Thursday:
  • 1. What does Hamlet say in his first soliloquy (1.2.311-344) that he cannot say to Claudius or Gertrude in the open? For example, how does he express his grief over his father’s death differently in public than he does in private?
  • 2. Who says,“Something is rotten in the state of Denmark” (1.4.678) and to what does “rotten” refer in this context?
  • 3. What’s the official story of Old King Hamlet’s death? How did the Old King actually die? (1.5.744-775)
  • 4. What does the Ghost ask Hamlet to do(1.5.776)?

Generating Claims

Follow along as we review the claim generating exercise and then be prepared to read your draft claim from Hamlet, Act 1 out loud:
  • 1. First, let’s review the Literary Analysis Essay Assignment
  • 2. According to the handout, what is the Destabilizing Condition?
  • 3. Before we read our claims out loud, take 2-3 minutes and revise your claim.
  • The Destabilizing Condition Claim

    Even though it seems as if ___________________________ because of

    ______________________, I’ll argue___________________________. I argue

    __________________ because____________________________________.

    Close Reading

    Our practice claims show how we will have two parts in our paper claims to establish and solve: 1. the problem of what the play means; 2. problems in the world. Just as the claim has two parts, so too should your analysis: the official story and the other gesture(s). To practice this bifurcated mode of reading we’re going to Close Read Hamlet’s response to the Ghost (1.5.777-97)

    Let’s respond to the following questions:
    • 1. Set the scene: What’s going on?  Who can hear him? Does the speech have larger effects on the plot or action of the play?
    • 2. Key images: What are some key images? For example, what does Hamlet mean when he uses images such as, “this distracted globe” (1.5.782)
    • 3. Rhetorical Features: To whom does Hamlet address the speech? What sorts of sentences does he use and how do those sentences shift?
    • 4. Interpretation 1 (official story): What’s the main point of this speech? What sorts of promises does Hamlet make? What steps does he take to fulfill his promises?
    • 5. Interpretation 2 (other gestures): Do you believe Hamlet will fulfill his promise? Why or why not? 

    Student Teaching Groups

    Look over the Student Teaching dates posted below and then get into your groups. Please note that the Oct 16 date has been changed to Nov 18 because one of our guest speakers had to revise his schedule. If you have been assigned that date, and need to change it, let me know after class.

    ENGL 1101.F2


    Group Number Group Names Dates
    G1 Zeyu, Enerelt, Jialou, Firaas R, Oct 25
    G2 Brandon, Max, Hannah, Hui Min, Dorian R, Nov 8
    G3 Jintong, Fei, Hae Won, Eni R, Nov 1
    G4 Mark, Tejas, Jiale, Akhil R, Oct 18
    G5 Jarod, Elton, Esther, Sanyu R, Oct 4
    G6 Thiago, Danya, Akshay, Elias, Ashley R, Oct 11

    ENGL1101.N2


    Group Number Group Names Dates
    G7 Patrick, Margaret, Mathew, Mai R, Oct 11
    G8 Melissa, Samantha, Henrick, John T, Nov 6
    G9 Dov, Omar, Dustin, Giancarlo R, Oct 18
    G10 Danny, Maya, Kyle, Rishi T, Oct 2
    G11 Henna, Lauren, Jeremy R, Nov 1
    G12 Shrya, Greyson, Alvin, Summahay R, Oct 4

    ENGL 1101.D2


    Group Number Group Name Dates
    G13 Brandon, Ravi, Andres, David T, Oct 2
    G14 Ben, Anna, Siddarth, Cecelia, Andrew R, Nov 8
    G15 Maya, Manisha, Avni, Jennifer R, Nov 1
    G16 Kevin, Jason, Brett, Wyatt R, Oct 18
    G17 Shakeeb, Mitchell, Michael Tang, Andy R, Oct 11
    G18 Thomas, Kenny, Michawel Chen, Kiet R, Oct 25

    20 September. Hamlet, Act 1 & Generating Claims

    Remote Classroom Instructions

    For full attendance/participation on R, Sept 20, please complete the following:
    • 1. Read Hamlet 1.2-1.5
    • 2. Respond to the following prompts and then bring your responses to class on Tuesday, September 25

    Hamlet, 1.2-1.5

    Please read through the following questions, choose one, and respond to it in a approx. 150-200 words.
    • 1. What does Hamlet say in his first soliloquy (1.2.311-344) that he cannot say to Claudius or Gertrude in the open? For example, how does he express his grief over his father’s death differently in public than he does in private?
    • 2. Who says,“Something is rotten in the state of Denmark” (1.4.678) and to what does “rotten” refer in this context?
    • 3. What’s the official story of Old King Hamlet’s death? How did the Old King actually die? (1.5.744-775)
    • 4. What does the Ghost ask Hamlet to do(1.5.776), and how does Hamlet respond to the Ghost’s request (1.5.777-797)?

    Claim Generating Exercise

    • 1. First, review the Literary Analysis Essay Assignment
    • 2. Next, read trough the sample claim on this handout from the Yale Writing Center: Destabilizing Condition. Consider the following while you read: What is her argument? How does the author of the sample paragraph establish her argument and how does she establish the stakes of the argument?
    • 3. Now read over the response you wrote to one of the questions above
    • 4. Finally, use your response to the question above to fill out the template below:

    Template: The Destabilizing Condition Claim

    Even though it seems as if ___________________________ because of

    ______________________, I’ll argue___________________________. I argue

    __________________ because____________________________________.

     

    At the start of class on Tuesday, Sept 25, you will all read your “destabilizing condition claim” out loud, so please be sure to fill out the template above.

    RQ: Hamlet 1.2-5

    Directions

    Keep the following questions in mind as you read Hamlet 1.2-5 The questions are designed to guide your reading practices and our class discussions. You are not required to provide formal answers in class or online.

    1.2

     

    What is the occasion of 1.2? Why have all the courtiers gathered in the Courtroom? Is the occasion official and why?

    When does 1.2 take place?

    What are some things that are topsy-turvy, preposterous, or dislocated in 1.2?

    What does Fortinbras want from King Claudius and how does Claudius respond?

    What does Laertes want from Claudius and how does he respond?

    Why does Claudius address Hamlet last and what does he want him to do?

    What is Hamlet’s first line and what does he mean when he says, “A little more than kin and less than kind” (1.2.65)? What sorts of characteristics does Hamlet establish with this line?

    How/why do Hamlet and Gertrude play on the term “common” (1.2.72 & 73); what does the term “common” denote when Claudius uses it later (1.2. 98 & 103)?

    According to Hamlet what are some affects or attributes of mourning or grief that a person might perform? Why is grief the opposite of a performance? How can we know for sure that he is telling us the truth?

    How does Claudius react to Hamlet’s mourning? How does Claudius try to persuade Hamlet to a different mood? Is he successful? Why/why not?

    What’s a soliloquy?

    What does Hamlet reveal to the audience in his first soliloquy (1.2.126-58)? For example, what has he lost? What is his reaction to that loss? Is his reaction to loss appropriate, why/why not? What sorts of words does he use to frame his loss, OR what discourse communities does he draw from to depict his suffering?

    How does Horatio react when Hamlet says, “My father, methinks I see my father” (1.2.183)?

    How does Horatio convince Hamlet to come see the ghost? Is Hamlet a sceptic? Is Horatio?

    Why do you think Shakespeare makes the audience sit through a retelling of the scene we just watched?

    How faithful is Horatio’s retelling of the events of 1.1? Does he embellish?

    1.3

    What advice does Laertes give to his sister Ophelia? What’s your assessment of Laertes and/or his advice?

    What are Ophelia’s first lines?

    How does Ophelia respond to her brother’s advice?

    Compare Hamlet to Laertes.

    What advice does Polonius give to Laertes? Does Polonius give his son good advice? What are some ironies in the advice Polonius gives?

    How does Polonius respond to Ophelia’s disclosure that Hamlet has “of late made many tenders/Of his affections” (1.3.98-99)? What work does Polonius make the word “tender” perform?

    How does Ophelia respond to her father’s commands?

    How/why does Polonius treat Ophelia differently than he treats Laertes? What’s your assessment of Polonius’s relationship with his son and daughter? OR, what’s your assessment of him as a father/Father?

    Does Polonius read Hamlet’s affections toward Ophelia correctly, if not, why not?

    1.4

    What is Claudius doing while Hamlet, Horatio, and Marcellus are out on the wall again, watching for the ghost? What’s Hamlet’s opinion of his uncle/stepfather’s behavior?

    What are some questions that Hamlet asks the ghost? What are some names Hamlet uses to address the ghost and why?

    Why are Marcellus and Horatio afraid to let Hamlet follow the ghost? What bad things do they imagine the ghost could do to him? What reasons does Hamlet give for his lack of fear (1.4.64-8)?

    Do Horatio’s warnings about the ghost come true?

    Who says, “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark” (1.4.90), and what does he mean?

    1.5

    Where does the Ghost go when the sun comes up and why does he have to go there?

    What does the Ghost want Hamlet to do?

    What’s the official story of Old King Hamlet’s death?

    How did the Old King actually die?

    Why does the Ghost figure Claudius, his brother, as a snake in the retelling of both the false report and the true report of his murder?

    Compare Hamlet’s description of his parent’s marriage (1.2.137-146) to the Ghost’s description of their marriage (1.5.41-56). If you believe their accounts, then how do you read Gertrude?

    What does the Ghost want Hamlet to do to Gertrude?

    How does Hamlet respond to the Ghost’s request?

    To what does Hamlet command Marcellus and Horatio to swear?

    How does the following illustrate some of the benefits and drawbacks of preservation?

    18 Sept. Poster Reflection & Hamlet 1.1

    Reflection

    Take five minutes and respond to the following. Be prepared to share your answers in discussion:
  • 1. According to your First Week Videos, what WOVEN mode did you anticipate offering the most challenges? How did you address challenges you perceive in the mode you discussed through any portion of the Poster assignment? 
  • Mahara How-To

    Student Teaching Groups & Date Sign-up

    • Get into your assigned groups and them fill out the Student Teaching Date Preference form below. Just fill out one form per group, please.

    ENGL 1101.F2


    Group Number Group Members
    G1 Zeyu, Enerelt, Jialou, Firaas
    G2 Brandon, Max, Hannah, Hui Min, Dorian
    G3 Jintong, Fei Pei, Hae Won, Eni
    G4 Mark, Tejas, Jiale, Akhil
    G5 Jarod, Elton, Esther, Sanyu
    G6 Thiago, Danya, Akshay, Elias, Ashley

    ENGL 1101.N1


    Group Number Group Members
    G7 Patrick, Margaret, Mathew, Mai
    G8 Melissa, Samantha, Henrick, John
    G9 Dov, Omar, Dustin, Giancarlo
    G10 Danny, Maya, Kyle, Rishi
    G11 Henna, Lauren, Jeremy
    G12 Shrya, Greyson, Alvin, Summahay

    ENGL 1101.D2


    Group Members Group Members
    G13 Brandon, Ravi, Andres, David
    G14 Ben, Anna, Siddarth, Cecelia, Andrew
    G15 Maya, Manisha, Avni, Jennifer
    G16 Kevin, Jason, Brett, Wyatt
    G17 Shakeeb, Mitchell, Michael Tang, Andy
    G18 Thomas, Kenny, Michawel Chen, Kiet

    Student Teaching Date Preference Form

     

    Hamlet

    • Given what you already know about Hamlet and/or what Stephen Greenblatt covers in the introduction, in what ways is Hamlet psychological? In what ways is the play political? 

     “Who’s There” (1.1.20): Nonverbal Communication & Interpretation

    First, what are some characteristics of Nonverbal communication and how does Nonverbal communication effect meaning?

    Get into pairs and choose one person to play Barnardo and one person to play Francisco.

    Read through the lines according to the directions below, and then be prepared to share your interpretations with the class

    • 1. Read lines 1.1.1-1.1.20 with no inflection
    • 2. Read lines 1.1.1-1.1.20 and emphasize the psychological themes audiences can expect from the play 
    • 3. Read lines 1.1.1-1.1.20 and emphasize the political themes audiences can expect from the play

     

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