29 November & 2 December. Portfolio W/S 1-2

Housekeeping/Extra Credit

  • 1. Be prepared to share how you composed a final draft of a page or two of your portfolio for next Tuesday (10 pts.)
  • 2. Sign up for and attend the SLS Student Showcase. (10 pts.)

    The SLS Student showcase will be held December 4, 4-5:30pmKlaus Atrium. 

    The showcase will feature projects that engage:

    SLS seeks a diversity of projects (posters, videos, prototypes, etc.), and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place prizes will be awarded in the form of gift cards.

Final Portfolio Assignment 

Reflective Introduction

The following is the checklist of requirements you need to fulfill for full credit on the Reflective Introduction Essay to be included in the Final Portfolio. Take a minute or Two and read through the checklist.

For full credit on the Final Portfolio, you need to compose a reflective, introductory essay of 1200-1800 words in which you draw out an argument from the projects you completed this semester, i.e. the artifacts you curated into your portfolio. A successful Reflective Introduction Essay will accomplish the following:
  • 1. Develop an argument about your intellectual growth as a communicator through the close analysis of artifacts in the portfolio. Make sure your Reflective Introduction is an essay and not a list in paragraph format.
  • 2. Show and tell readers how you met or attempted to meet the course outcomes/instructor’s goals as articulated on the syllabus and throughout the course.
  • 3. Reflect on your strength and weaknesses relative to the course goals/outcomes
  • 4. Describe the methods and modes that were the focus of your communicative work this semester.
  • 5. Articulate areas and strategies you would like to focus on for continued improvement.

Group Analysis: Reflective Introduction

After you get into your groups, Take 5-8 minutes and read the Reflective Introduction in this sample portfolio. Afterward be prepared to discuss the following:
  • 1. Group One: What is the topic or unifying idea of the Introduction? What claims or sets of claims does the author make about that topic/unifying idea? What are some rhetorical gestures employed by the author?
  • 2. Group Two: Describe how the author has organized her paragraphs. Are some parts of the essay more successful than others, why or why not?
  • 3. Group Three: Describe the evidence and analysis in the essay. Does the evidence and analysis fully support and develop the claim, why or why not?
  • 4. Group Four: Describe the design/layout of the first page of this Portfolio. Does the author make efficient or innovative use of the affordances of the genre/tool. What’s your assessment of the page layout? For instance, what’s your assessment of the relationship between the written and visual text? What’s your assessment of paragraph structure?

Reflective Essay Freewrite

On your own, freewrite for 5-8 minutes in response to each of the following prompts. Be prepared to discuss your response with the class after each:
  • 1. Rhetorical Awareness/Stance: From the beginning of the semester to this moment, why have you “grown as a communicator”?

    Your response to the question will form the topic and generate the claim of your reflection. To answer this question, think about the five major communicative modes in WOVEN–have you developed in any one of those areas more than others? Also, think about the artifacts you have produced this semester, what assignments or specific modes within assignments can you point to to show “development” over time? You may also want to frame your claim and subsequent essay in terms of one or more areas featured on the Common Feedback Chart.

  • 2. Draft an outline of the 4-6 paragraphs you imagine will follow from the claim you just generated.

    Organization: While the artifacts in the portfolio serve as evidence, remember, just like in the Literary Analysis Essay, you never want to lead with the evidence. Instead, you want to lead with claim and move from paragraph to paragraph in service of that claim.

  • 3. What artifacts do you plan to analyze to develop & support the claim you generated? (i.e. what final assignments best show your growth as a communicator?)

    Development of Ideas: How can you describe and analyze your own work the way we have described and analyzed images, poetry, essays, and film this semester? What key terms can you borrow from our analysis of design, rhetoric, fiction, and/or film to apply to your own artifacts?

Mahara ‘How-To’ Video

 

Mahara Gathering Pages and Generating a Collection SlideSHow

27 November. Video W/S

Revision

  • While revision is built into all major assignments, during the semester you will have the opportunity to revise one major assignment that earns a B- or below. If you wish to revise a graded assignment, meet with me during office hours or by appointment to discuss steps and due dates. The revised assignment will receive an entirely new grade (not an average of the old and new grade).

Extra Credit

  • If you want to earn 10 extra-credit points, come to class with a draft of your portfolio and be prepared to discuss your composition process with the rest of the class on Tuesday, Dec 4th.

Video Workshop

Get into your video groups and discuss the following. I’ll come around and chat with each group. If possible, be prepared to share drafts of your video.
  • 1. What is the central topic and claim about the topic?
  • 2. Who is your audience and how have you utilized the affordances of video to capture your audience’s attention and persuade them of your claims, i.e. transitions, different types of footage, sound queues, a central narrative or narrator, etc.?
  • 3. Are you having any problems with the form or content? Are you having any work flow problems?

13 & 15 November. Remote Group Video Workshops

Remember class will be held remotely on 13 and 15th of November. Please check the time and date listed to the left of your names below and be in your group’s Google Doc when assigned.

Tuesday, Nov 13: Video Group Workshops


Group Number Student Names Meeting Time
G4 Mark, Tejas, Jiale, Akhil 9:30-9:50
G5 Jarod, Elton, Esther, Sanyu 10:55-11:20
G6 Thiago, Danya, Akshay, Elias, Ashley 10:20-10:45
G10 Danny, Kyle, Rishi 12:00-12:25
G11 Henna, Lauren, Jeremy 12:30-12:50
G12 Shrya, Greyson, Alvin, Summahay 12:55-1:15
G16 Kevin, Jason, Brett, Wyatt 1:30-1:50
G17 Shakeeb, Mitchell, Michael Tang, Andy 1:55-2:20
G18 Thomas, Kenny, Michael Chen, Kiet 2:20-2:45

Thursday, Nov 15: Video Group Workshops


Group Number Student Names Meeting Time
G1 Zeyu, Enerelt, Jialou, Firaas 9:30-9:50
G2 Brandon, Max, Hannah, Dorian 10:55-10:20
G3 Jintong, Fei Pei, Hae Won, Eni 10:20-10:45
G7 Patrick, Margaret, Mathew, Mai 12:00-12:25
G8 Melissa, Samantha, Henrick, John 12:30-12:50
G9 Dov, Omar, Dustin, Giancarlo 12:55-1:15
G13 Brandon, Ravi, Andres, David 1:30-1:50
G14 Ben, Anna, Siddarth, Cecelia, Andrew 1:55-2:20
G15 Maya, Manisha, Avni, Jennifer 2:20-2:45

 

8 November. Just Eat It & Video Invention Activity.

Housekeeping

  • 1. Double check your Group Video Workshop date/time. Be in the Google Doc a few minutes before your scheduled meeting and be sure to request access to the Doc well in advance of your schedule meeting!
  • 2. Remember we will not be meeting face to face till November 27. You need to bring a draft of your video for workshop, 3-4 minutes to share
  • 3. With the exception of today’s groups, you all need to have your Student Teaching Materials submitted by 11/10 at 11:59 PM for full credit.

Just Eat It: Student Teaching Groups


Group Number Student Names
G2 Brandon, Max, Hannah, Hui Min, Dorian
G8 Melissa, Samantha, Henrick, John
G14 Ben, Anna, Siddarth, Cecelia, Andrew

Video Group Conferences

  • Get into your groups, log-into your group Google Docs and work through the discussion questions listed there

Tuesday, Nov 13: Video Group Workshops


Group Number Student Names Meeting Time
G4 Mark, Tejas, Jiale, Akhil 9:30-9:50
G5 Jarod, Elton, Esther, Sanyu 10:55-11:20
G6 Thiago, Danya, Akshay, Elias, Ashley 10:20-10:45
G10 Danny, Maya, Kyle, Rishi 12:00-12:25
G11 Henna, Lauren, Jeremy 12:30-12:50
G12 Shrya, Greyson, Alvin, Summahay 12:55-1:15
G16 Kevin, Jason, Brett, Wyatt 1:30-1:50
G17 Shakeeb, Mitchell, Michael Tang, Andy 1:55-2:20
G18 Thomas, Kenny, Michael Chen, Kiet 2:20-2:45

Thursday, Nov 15: Video Group Workshops


Group Number Student Names Meeting Time
G1 Zeyu, Enerelt, Jialou, Firaas 9:30-9:50
G2 Brandon, Max, Hannah, Hui Min, Dorian 10:55-11:20
G3 Jintong, Fei Pei, Hae Won, Eni 10:20-10:45
G7 Patrick, Margaret, Mathew, Mai 12:00-12:25
G8 Melissa, Samantha, Henrick, John 12:30-12:50
G9 Dov, Omar, Dustin, Giancarlo 12:55-1:15
G13 Brandon, Ravi, Andres, David 1:30-1:50
G14 Ben, Anna, Siddarth, Cecelia, Andrew 1:55-2:20
G15 Maya, Manisha, Avni, Jennifer 2:20-2:45

1 November. Video Invention Activity & Wasteland.

Featured Image: Wasteland, Vic Muniz (PBS)

Housekeeping

  • 1. Thanks for your patience with Tuesday’s cancellation.
  • 2. ENGl 1101. F2 & N1: Video Editing Workshop on Nov 6. ENGl 1101. D2: free period Nov 6.
  • 3. Please note also, Tuesday, Nov 13 and Thursday, Nov 15 are video group conference days, which will be held remotely. See below and the the calendar for your group meeting assignments. Please submit to me, in advance of your conference 1. a draft of a script and 2. a draft of Story board.

Tuesday, Nov 13: Video Group Workshops


Group Number Student Names Meeting Time
G4 Mark, Tejas, Jiale, Akhil 9:30-9:50
G5 Jarod, Elton, Esther, Sanyu 10:55-11:20
G6 Thiago, Danya, Akshay, Elias, Ashley 10:20-10:45
G10 Danny, Maya, Kyle, Rishi 12:00-12:25
G11 Henna, Lauren, Jeremy 12:30-12:50
G12 Shrya, Greyson, Alvin, Summahay 12:55-1:15
G16 Kevin, Jason, Brett, Wyatt 1:30-1:50
G17 Shakeeb, Mitchell, Michael Tang, Andy 1:55-2:20
G18 Thomas, Kenny, Michawel Chen, Kiet 2:20-2:45

Thursday, Nov 15: Video Group Workshops


Group Number Student Names Meeting Time
G1 Zeyu, Enerelt, Jialou, Firaas 9:30-9:50
G2 Brandon, Max, Hannah, Hui Min, Dorian 10:55-11:20
G3 Jintong, Fei Pei, Hae Won, Eni 10:20-10:45
G7 Patrick, Margaret, Mathew, Mai 12:00-12:25
G8 Melissa, Samantha, Henrick, John 12:30-12:50
G9 Dov, Omar, Dustin, Giancarlo 12:55-1:15
G13 Brandon, Ravi, Andres, David 1:30-1:50
G14 Ben, Anna, Siddarth, Cecelia, Andrew 1:55-2:20
G15 Thomas, Kenny, Michawel Chen, Kiet 2:20-2:45

Group Video Project Preliminary W/S

Take 15 minutes to get into your Video Groups and complete the following:
  • 1. Review the Video Assignment
  • 2. Generate a list of possible Video topics.
  • 3. Assign roles/divide workload and also schedule meeting times.

    While I encourage you to meet on your own as needed, I have also set aside class time for you to meet Please note Nov 20 is a “Video Editing Day,” where class does not meet face to face. You are also free to meet during class time on the day you do not have your Group Workshops.

Vox Media, “The Environmental Cost of 2 Day Shipping,” (2017)

 

Student Teaching: Vic Muniz’s, Wasteland (2010)


Group Numbers Student Names
G3 Jintong, Fei, Hae Won, Eni
G11 Henna, Lauren, Jeremy
G15 Maya, Manisha, Avni, Jennifer

25 October. Inconvenient Truth & Writing Process Reflection.

Worland, Justin. “How Your Trash Contributes to Climate Change.” 22 September 2015.

Housekeeping

Essay Process Reflection

Take 5-8 minutes and respond to the following:
  • 1. Narrate, describe, tell the story of how your paper developed. Your “story” should proceed through the following: Did you start by responding to the prompt? Did you start with a key chunk of text you wanted to write about? What sorts of invention writing did you do? What classroom activities/discussions developed/changed your thinking? What sort of feedback did you receive? What changed draft to draft?
  • 2. Draw the “story” of your Essay writing process on the board

Student Teaching Groups


Groups Students
G1 Zeyu, Enerelt, Jialou, Firaas
G9 Dov, Omar, Dustin, Giancarlo
G18 Thomas, Kenny, Michael Chen, Kiet

Scene Analysis: An Inconvenient Truth

As we watch the clip from Gore’s movie/slide share talk, please keep the following in mind:
  • 1. Context: What “happens” in the selected sequence on the level of plot? What is the function of this sequence within the larger narrative action (foreshadowing, climax, transition, exposition, etc,)? What is the overall goal of the clip?
  • Describe the Frame is it open form: frame is de-emphasized, has a “snapshot” quality? Is it closed form: frame is composed and self-contained, the frame acts as a boundary and a limit?. How does the frame help communicate the goal of the documentary to the audience?
  • 3. Describe the Set. Is it in a studio or a location? What props are used? Are they used symbolically? How do the sets help Gore convey his message? 
  • 4. Describe the Design (symmetrical or asymmetrical; balanced or unbalanced; stylized or natural; does it belong to a certain period or artistic style). How does design help Gore communicate his goal? 

23 October, Essay W/S & Inconvenient Truth Intro.

Housekeeping

  • 1. Remember Oct 30:  All sections attend the Climate Stories Lecture and Discussion at 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM in Klaus 1456; ENGL F2 and ENGL N2 ONLY attend the Lecture; ENGL D2 Meet at Please meet at the Homer Rice Classroom in the Library
  • Group 8: I need to reschedule your presentation; talk with me after class.
  • ENGL D2: no regularly scheduled class on Nov 6

W/S: Literary Analysis Essay

  • 1. Please read through the questions below, and then take yourself and your draft to the number that corresponds to the question that best describes the biggest challenge you face in your Essay draft.
  • 2. Once in your groups, take turns reading/describing your draft and then discuss revision strategies. I will circulate from group to group and answer questions.
  • 3. Once in your groups, take turns reading/describing your draft and then discuss revision strategies.
  • 4. I will circulate from group to group and answer questions.

The numbers of the questions below correspond to numbers on the board
  • 1. Claims: Does the draft address the situation and assignment: Does the Essay make an arguable claim about Hamlet and Bad Collections or one or more of the following, subsidiary, terms: hoarding, archives, vibrant matter, preservation, salvage, recycling, accumulation, or object oriented ontology.
  • 2. Secondary Sources: Does the draft show the argument fits into larger conversations, define key terms, provide context about Hamlet by citing/analyzing at least one secondary, scholarly/valid source? 
  • 3. Evidence/Close Reading: Does the author develop his/her claim through fully analyzed evidence that supports all related claims in the draft? Does the author develop her/his claim through close analysis of the linguistic features and meaning of at least three passages from Hamlet
  • 4. Organization: Does the draft sustain the claim throughout?  Are transitions from one portion of the Essay to the next clear and logical? Has author adapted typical organizational patterns of academic writing? Is there a conclusion? 
  • 5. Conventions:Does the draft include at least two visuals? Does the draft meet grammar, mechanics style, and syntax conventions with few or no errors? Is draft in MLA? 

Writing FAQ’s

  • Does your essay begin with some version of “William Shakespeare wrote Hamlet during the Renaissance OR Hamlet is the greatest play of all time”?

    If yes, revise that sentence: Try replacing that opening line with a declarative sentence more in line with your claim. Maybe, William Shakespeare’s Hamlet dramatizes the limits (or failure) of preservation.

  • Do you open your essay with a cold-open, i.e. a reading of scene that demonstrates the topic you plan to spin your claim out of?

    If yes, feel free to cite a bit of the text from the scene. Also cite the strangest bit of text OR the bit of text with your key term/idea in it.

  • Do you really explain your claim at the end of the first paragraph?

    If no, be sure to finish big in the last final sentences of the first paragraph. Those sentences do really important work tying the whole of the paper together.

  • Do you lead with your claim in the topic sentence of the “literature review” paragraph?

    If not, how can you revise that sentence so that you lead with the claim in the first half, and then introduce what will follow in the second, i.e. As is well known, Hamlet dramatizes the limits of preservation.

  • Does anyone have a topic sentence that begins, “In act five, scene one Hamlet will not let go of the dead?

    If yes, revise. Lead with your claim; not where the evidence you plan to read occurs. So a revised version of the sentence above may read, “Hamlet will not let go of the dead.”

  • Do you skip straight from the citations to your claim?

    If yes, SLOW DOWN. Remember to explain the citation to the audience. If you are talking about Hamlet’s oath to the Ghost for example, pick out some of the images and talk about them. So what’s “distracted globe” mean? Why does Hamlet switch from the globe metaphor to the book/library metaphor? What’s a “saw” (1.5.782)? Why is it weird to remember something by removing all other memories? How does the irony of these lines show ways the preservation project may be in trouble? Try to explain these lines to someone who hasn’t read them and then move into how/why your explanation supports your claim.

  • Does the amount of close analysis following your citations, justify the length of the citation?

    If not, just cite the amount of text you need, i.e. two lines or two words.

  • Do you signal why you move from section to section?

    If no, let readers know why you are moving from section of the paper to another. For example, why move from Hamlet’s oath to Ghost scene to the scene with the players? What new information does the scene with the players give us, your readers, about ways Hamlet’s preservation project is progressing (or not)? Lead a transition paragraph with a sentence that shows us why you move onto the player’s speech and how it fits into the larger aims of the paper.

  • Do you write about Hamlet in chronological order?

    If yes, please note: the scenes in your paper do not need to appear in the same order they occur in the play.

  • Do you write about Hamlet in the present tense?

    If not, revise. Always write about literature (any literature) in the present tense

  • When you connect your paper topic to a contemporary climate or environmental issue, does the connection take the complexity of the topic into account?  

    If no, revise. For example, just learned from your paper how terribly difficult or even impossible the preservation of life can be. How much other death did Hamlet cause in the rush to bring his father back from the dead? Now that you know how complicated preservation is, what can you say to a preservation projects going on now in the face of Climate Change?

  • Do you have questions about MLA?

    If yes, check out these sites: Perdue Owl, MLA and Citing Images from a data base in MLA

Scene Analysis: An Inconvenient Truth

As we watch the clip from Gore’s movie/slide share talk, please keep the following in mind:
  • 1. Context: What “happens” in the selected sequence on the level of plot? What is the function of this sequence within the larger narrative action (foreshadowing, climax, transition, exposition, etc,)? What is the overall goal of the clip?
  • Describe the Frame is it open form: frame is de-emphasized, has a “snapshot” quality? Is it closed form: frame is composed and self-contained, the frame acts as a boundary and a limit?. How does the frame help communicate the goal of the documentary to the audience?
  • 3. Describe the Set. Is it in a studio or a location? What props are used? Are they used symbolically? How do the sets help Gore convey his message? 
  • 4. Describe the Design (symmetrical or asymmetrical; balanced or unbalanced; stylized or natural; does it belong to a certain period or artistic style). How does design help Gore communicate his goal? 

18 October, Hamlet 5

Student Teaching Groups


Group Number Students
G4 Mark, Tejas, Jiale, Akhil
G16 Kevin, Jason, Brett, Wyatt
Please get into groups and discuss your responses to question that corresponds to group number. Once finished, draw your response on the board:
  • Group 1:How does Hamlet react when he finds out who’s skull he’s really holding (5.1.3373-3382)?
  • Group Two:How does Hamlet react when he finds out that Ophelia is dead and about to be buried (5.1.3471-3481)?
  • Group Three: Is Hamlet different when he gets back from his sea adventure (5.2.3669-76)
  • Group Four: What final, dying request does Hamlet make of Horatio and how does Horatio respond (5.2.3916-3824)?

Writing Workshop

  • 1. How to insert images? Any MLA or format questions?
  • 2. Write your paper topic/argument on the board.
  • 3. Discussion: What are you doing in your concussions? OR what does your essay have to do with environmental devastation and/or Climate Change?

Sample Essay

HamletSamplePaper

11 October. Hamlet’s Ecologies. Act 4.

For Tuesday, Oct 16

In advance of Mark Johnson’s Class Visit, please complete the following:

Group Presentations


Group Number Group Memebers
G6 Thiago, Danya, Akshay, Elias, Ashley
G7 Patrick, Margaret, Mathew, Mai
G17 Shakeeb, Mitchell, Michael Tang, Andy

How does nature threaten political systems in Hamlet?

Respond to the question above based on the chunks of text below:
  • What do you make of Hamlet’s ecology: “Your worm is your only emperor for diet. We fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots. Your fat king and your lean beggar is but variable service, two dishes but to one table. That’s the end” (4.3.2685-2691)?
  • What does Horatio mean when he says of Ophelia, “Her speech is nothing,/Yet the unshapèd use of it doth move/The hearers to collection” (4.5.2752-54)?
  • What does Ophelia mean when she say the following and why frame her feelings as she does: “There’s fennel for you, and columbines. There’s rue for you, and here’s some for me; we may call it herb of grace o’Sundays. You may wear your rue with a difference. There’s a daisy. I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died. They say ‘a made a good end” (4.5.2932-2936).
  • To what/whom does Gertrude attribute agency in her report of Ophelia’s death and why?

    There is a willow grows aslant a brook
    That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream.
    Therewith fantastic garlands did she make
    Of crowflowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples,
    That liberal shepherds give a grosser name,
    But our cold maids do dead men’s fingers call them.
    There on the pendent boughs her crownet weeds
    Clamb’ring to hang, an envious sliver broke,
    When down her weedy trophies and herself
    Fell in the weeping brook. Her clothes spread wide,
    And mermaid-like awhile they bore her up,
    Which time she chanted snatches of old lauds,
    As one incapable of her own distress,
    Or like a creature native and endued
    Unto that element. But long it could not be
    Till that her garments, heavy with their drink,
    Pulled the poor wretch from her melodious lay
    To muddy death. (4.7.3159-75)